Chess Engines


Welcome to my chess engines page. Here I give an overview of some of the chess engines available today.

These pages are mainly about UCI Chess engines, which are taking over WinBoard engines. It is also possible to “convert” WinBoard engines into UCI engines, although this may decrease their playing strength.

Most UCI and WinBoard engines mentioned on these pages are freeware, although we will also list commercial programs. All the authors must be commended for continually developing new and improved chess engines.

Don’t judge chess engines only by engine tournaments. Some are created to play like humans, while some are created to be useful in analysis

If you download an engine take a look into the “readme” files. Most authors ask for response like games, results or bug reports. You can help them improve their chess engine.

WinBoard Chess Engines

Here, as well as showing how to use a WinBoard engine in an UCI interface, I list a range of the most popular WinBoard chess engines.

If you download an engine take a look into the readme files. Most authors ask for response like games, results or bug reports. You can help them improve their chess engine.

How to use a WinBoard engine under a UCI interface

Here’s a short summary. This is not said anywhere, but I wouldn’t be surprised if the WinBoard engine doesn’t play as well under UCI as it would normally. The conversion process is detailed on Odd Gunnar Malin’s website.

1. Download the WinBoard engine, and extract it into its own folder.

2. Download “Wb2Uci”, a program essential for the conversion of WinBoard engines to UCI engines. You can download it from Odd Gunnar Malin’s website. Copy the wb2uci.exe and wb2uci.eng files into the engine folder you created before.

3. Edit the “wb2uci.eng” and the “configfile” of the engine. Both these files should be edited in “notepad”.

WinBoard engines

Engine pages has engines available for download!

Name Picture Author Details
AnMon Christian Barreteau, France
Arasan Robert Hyatt,
USA
Crafty Jon Dart,
USA
FTP Homepage
EXChess Dan Homan
USA
Faile Adrien Regimbald,
Canada
Gromit F.Schneider, K.Skibbe,
Germany
Phalanx Dusan Dobes,
Czech
Pulsar Mike Adams, USA Homepage
The Crazy Bishop Remi Coulom,
France
Homepage
The King (commercial) Johan de Koning,
Netherlands
Chessmaster Homepage

UCI Chess Engines

If you download an engine take a look into the readme files. Most authors ask for response like games, results or bug reports. You can help them improve their chess engine.

To purchase products, I recommend Wholesale Chess. They provide the highest quality chess products at the lowest prices (especially for US and Canadian players). They even offer to match prices with other chess websites! Even though I live overseas, this is where I choose to purchase chess goods.

For chess opening training and repertoire maintenance, I highly recommend the software I use, Chess Openings Wizard. This software was approved by Grandmaster Peter Svidler (FIDE rating 2744 as of January 2010) many years ago.

Free UCI Engines

Engine pages has engines available for download!

Engine Picture Author Details
AnMon Christian Barreteau, France
Aristarch Stefan Zipproth, Germany
Dragon Bruno Lucas,
France
Fruit Fabien Letouzey, France Homepage
Pharaon Franck Zibi,
France
Pro Deo Ed Schröder, Netherlands Homepage
Ruffian P. O. Valfridsson,
Sweden
Rybka (free version) Vasik Rajlich, Germany Homepage
Sjeng G. C. Pascutto,
Belgium
SOS Rudolph Huber,
Germany
Tao Bas Hamstra,
Netherlands
Toga II Thomas Gaksch, Germany
Fabien Letouzey, France
Yace Paderborn Dieter B.,
Germany

Commerical UCI Engines

 

Engine Picture Author Details
Rybka Vasik Rajlich, Germany Homepage
Fritz Frans Morsch and Mathias Feist, Germany
Shredder S. Meyer-Kahlen,
Germany
Zappa Anthony Cozzie, USA
Naum Alexander Naumov, Canada
Junior Amir Ban and Shay Bushinsky, Israel
Hiarcs Mark Uniacke, UK (?) Homepage

 

 

Chess Engines Ratings

Chess engine ratings allow us to gauge how strong a chess engine is. The ratings are calculated by pitting hundreds of chess engines against each other and checking their performance. There are two main chess engine rating websites. Currently, the chess engine Rybka is the world’s strongest chess engine.

Here is a snapshot of the world’s chess engine rating list. Last updated 26/03/08

Single Processor

Most of your computers will be single processor and these are engines tested only on one processor.

No. Chess Engine Chess Rating (Elo) Games Tested
1 Rybka 2.3.2a w32 2967 2490
2 Fritz 11 2916 3787
3 Deep Shredder 11 w32 2888 2003
4 Naum 3.0 w32 2885 795
5 Toga II 1.4 Beta5c 2859 1173
6 Zappa Mexico II w32 2844 650
7 Fruit 2.3.3f Beta 2839 1576
8 Hiarcs 11.1 2821 1702
9 Loop M1-P 2816 459
10 Thinker 5.1c 2783 491

Source: Chess Engines Grand Tournament

Multi Processor

Multi processors are computers with more than one processor. Typically 2 processors, but there can also be 4 and 8. Multi processors give engines a lot more memory and raw power so they will perform at a higher level.

No. Chess Engine Chess Rating (Elo) Games Tested
1 Rybka 2.3.2a x64 4CPU 3082 1791
2 Zappa Mexico II x64 4CPU 3023 793
3 Naum 3.0 x64 4CPU 3001 1229
4 Deep Shredder 11 x64 4CPU 2963 1211
5 Deep Fritz 10.1 4CPU 2935 930
6 Hiarcs 11.2 4CPU 2925 1397
7 Fruit 2.4 Beta A x64 2CPU 2914 782
8 Toga II 1.4 Beta5c 4CPU 2911 734
9 Loop M1-P 4CPU 2891 1076
10 Glaurung 2.0.1 x64 4CPU 2859 796

Source: Chess Engines Grand Tournament

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